17 seconds to better audio

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Listen to for 17 seconds to hear the difference that 17% can make. 


Problem: The main worship facility at South Delta Baptist Church of Delta, British Columbia seats approximately 1600 people with both main floor and in the upper balcony. Due to a 4 second reverb/decay time, a large percentage of the congregation was challenged in hearing the message due to a lack of vocal intelligibility - caused by excessive reverberation and echo.

Solution: Primacoustic Broadway panels were placed on only 17% of the wall surface and spread evenly throughout the sanctuary. Since the style of worship incorporates amplified instruments, careful attention was paid to the stage area to control reflections from vocal monitors, guitar amplifiers and drums.

As a result, reverberation was decreased from 4 seconds to just over 1 second, greatly improving intelligibility and enhancing the worship experience for everyone.

If you'd like to talk about acoustic solutions for your worship space, please get in touch with us.  We would be glad to create a custom solution for you. 


What are the differences between the Shure QLX-D and ULX-D?

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We get this question a lot, and thankfully, we found some information from Shure that neatly summarizes the facts and confirms our suspicions about audio quality.  The following article is a Tech Tep from the Shure Applications Engineering team.  

Typical Applications for QLX-D - corporate events, live music, higher education campuses, houses of worship, hotels, conference centers. For a corporate installation, consider QLX-D if all the receivers are on the same floor and/or use the same Ethernet network. For live music, consider QLX-D for a small or medium-size concert hall.

Key Differences between QLX-D and ULX-D

In terms of audio quality, reliability, and RF performance, QLX-D and ULX-D are the same. The primary differences are network sophistication and RF flexibility.

Read more: What are the differences between the Shure QLX-D and ULX-D?


Video display solutions for bright rooms

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Is your video projector washed out?  Not washed up, but washed out - as in, the light in the room is so bright that you can't see the image, no matter how bright the projector is.  It happens all of the time -- house lights, stage lights, sunlight.  Some of those can be fixed, but you can only go so far. 

Every day, we watch televisions, computer monitors, and our devices (phones, tablets, etc.) and we're pretty spoiled.  High brightness and beautiful color, and if you're indoors, these video displays generally unaffected by the light around you. 

Then we decide that we want to see that same image in a meeting room or auditorium.  If we're not careful with lighting placement or choosing the right projector and screen, we can see something like this.

Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 2.54.18 PM









You can't make out anything (video or words).  But that's what overhead fluorescent lights (let alone sunlight) can do.

With a conventional projection screen, there's not much else to expect, since the projected video image is picked up equally well compared to the other light sources and reflected back to your eye.  Add to that that the darkest part of the white screen is as black as your black on the screen can be. 

Does that make sense?  If so, how do you get a really good, dark, detailed black on a white screen with high ambient light.  Well, you don't. You get what's shown in the photo above. 

So what are my options, you ask?  Read on...

Read more: Video display solutions for bright rooms


Three Keys for Building Design

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Editor's note: We can't stress enough that you read this article, read it again, and then promise to follow all of Mike's recommendations.  If you do so, you'll be ahead of 90% of churches out there.  One of my investment advisors rants that no one really wants to learn about investing, but that most people just want a quick-fix.  It's the same in the technical world.  There are no shortcuts when it comes to proper planning, equipment selection, and integration. 

by Mike Sessler,

Today I’d like to tackle a few suggestions that I always give to churches who are starting a building project. I always say the same thing, mainly because these are the areas I see churches skipping time after time. Skipping these things ensures two things: First, you and your congregation will not be happy with the performance of the sound, lighting and/or video in the room. Second, there will remain a healthy market for companies that specialize in fixing churches that were designed and built poorly.

With that said, here are three things you cannot skimp on when entering a building project.

Fix the Acoustics Before You Build

First, the overall acoustic signature of the room has to be correct. This is where most churches skimp out. They let the architect design the building; which is fine except I've yet to meet an architect who has any real clue how acoustics work. A few do, but they're the ones who design churches for a living and have acousticians on staff.

The problem is most architects want the room to look nice and be easy to build.

Read more: Three Keys for Building Design


God Sees Your Service

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by Mike Sessler,

A big part of the problem with serving behind the scenes is that you are, by definition, supposed to be pretty much invisible. Most of the time, we technical artists are OK with that. We'd rather not be the ones on stage, talking to the crowd; or even in a big room full of people if we're honest. We like to be in the background, and that's OK. But there's a problem with being invisible.

We tend to feel invisible, too.

I'm sure it's happened to you (and if it hasn't, it will) on a Sunday afternoon that while you're picking up the stage, eager congregants will come up and tell the worship leader, band and pastor what a wonderful job they did. They'll go on and on about how much they love to worship, and how much they got out of the message. This is all good.

But it can sting a little, too.

We know that we helped make the service happen. Shoot, we may have even made the band a sound a lot better than they really are (reverb covers a multitude of sins, and sometimes turning down a guitar is better than turning it up...). We made sure the pastor's slides were made, and displayed at the right time. All the mic's worked exactly the way they were supposed to. The lighting complimented the music, and the service was technically excellent.

And nobody noticed.

Read more: God Sees Your Service


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What others say

By the way, the M-400 is stinkin' awesome!  I always knew it could do this stuff, but I've never seen it in action.  I set the loaner board up, stuck in my thumb drive, loaded my settings, and bam, there they were!

Every tweak, every name, every setting, all right there!

Just thought I'd share that with you!