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Technology for Worship:

It's what we do.

Welcome to Geartechs.com. We want to be your #1 source for pro audio, video, projection, and lighting equipment.

Our site offers the latest product reviews, how-to guides, news, and our blog to give you detailed insight and up-to-the-minute information that will help you discover exactly what you need.

   
Hand-picked Professional Audio Equipment.
Many dealers sell anything and everything. We sell what works. Get the right product every time at Geartechs.com.
   
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Need something new, but aren’t sure what? Do your research, ask a pro and buy the right equipment here.
   
Lighting & Musical Equipment
In addition to pro audio and video gear, we offer select lighting and musical products to enhance your worship experience.

New Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Hearing Assistance

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In 2010, the US government modified the standards for the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) with respect to public assembly spaces and the quantities of receivers and hearing aid compatible receivers.  All Assembly Areas are required to comply with the ADA.

So what is an Assembly Area by definition?  According to Section 219.2 of the 2010 ADA, an Assembly Area is:  A building or facility, or portion thereof, used for the purpose of entertainment, educational or civic gatherings, or similar purposes. For the purposes of these requirements, assembly areas include, but are not limited to, classrooms, lecture halls, courtrooms, public meeting rooms, public hearing rooms, legislative chambers, motion picture houses, auditoria, theaters, playhouses, dinner theaters, concert halls, centers for the performing arts, amphitheaters, arenas, stadiums, grandstands, or convention centers.

So where does that leave houses of worship or churches?

Read more: New Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Hearing Assistance

 

Shortening the digital learning curve

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by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

A while back I wrote a post on virtual soundcheck. Simply put, virtual soundcheck is a mechanism for capturing the inputs to your board as close to right after the mic pre as possible, then being able to easily play that back, in the same inputs as the real band. Digital consoles have made this process relatively easy, though the exact implementations vary.

The other day I was asked to recommend a digital console to a church who as looking to make the switch. As I pondered the options in their price range, one of their requirements kept coming back; the console should be fairly easy for volunteers to learn.

To some extent, this is a catch-22. An audio console is by nature a fairly complex device. The bigger they get, with more routing and mixing options, the higher the complexity. When moving to digital, the complexity factor goes higher. Even the best, most user-friendly consoles are still pretty complicated pieces of technology, and as such, require the user to spend a fair amount of time on them to be proficient.

This brought me back to virtual soundcheck. I thought of one of the ways we use virtual sound check, and that’s to train new volunteers. In the old days, training new volunteers had to happen either during the week, with no sound running through the board, at rehearsals, or--heaven forbid--during a service.

What I love about training with virtual soundcheck is...

Read more: Shortening the digital learning curve

   

Electro-Voice RE320 Reviewed

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by Mike Sessler, Coast Hills Community Church

The ElectroVoice RE20 has been from it's introduction a favorite of broadcasters and announcers. Somewhere along the line, someone stuck it in front of a bass cabinet and discovered it rocks as a bass mic. Then someone else put it in a kick drum and found it works wonders there, too. In fact, the RE20 is great on a lot of things. And while it's not super-expensive (at least by premium microphone standards), at $400-ish, it's not a budget mic either.

EV realized there was a market for a more cost-conscious version of the RE20. In January, 2011 at NAMM in Anaheim, they introduced the RE320. Priced at $299.

When I saw it at NAMM, I knew I had to try it. I've used the RE20 in the past, and always liked it. But I have a hard time justifying the price tag when I have so many other things that need attention.

The week before Easter, a box arrived; it was my demo RE320. We were re-setting the stage anyway, so I pulled the PR-48 out of the kick and stuck the RE320 in. I think it was the second or third kick during line check that I knew this mic was not going back.

I've tried a lot of different mics in the kick, and have only really ever been happy with one; the Heil PR-40. I'd love a PR-40, but at $325, it's a tougher sell. The PR-48 was okay, but I never felt we could get it positioned to give us both the punch and the clarity I wanted from the kick. We could get one or the other, but not both.

When I arrived at Coast, we had the "classic" combination of a Beta 91 inside and a Beta 52 in the hole. I know a lot of guys who like the dual mic technique in the kick, and I respect that. My preference however, is to use one. There are a lot of reasons for that which I won't detail here. But know that it's preference thing and I don't think dual mic'ing is wrong. I'd just rather not.

Read more: Electro-Voice RE320 Reviewed

   

The Sound Check Process

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by Mike Sessler, ChurchTechArts.org

The other day I was talking with Kevin Sanchez, and he asked me if I had ever written a post about our sound check procedure. I thought I had, but a quick search of the site turned up nothing. So here it is.

I’ve found the sound check to be one of the most important times of the entire weekend experience. It’s a short window in time that allows you to set the tone for the service, either for better or worse. A smooth, well-run sound check will put the musicians at ease and enable them to lead well. A rough one will elevate tension and put the service in jeopardy.

For me, the key to a successful soundcheck is all in the preparation. That means...

Read more: The Sound Check Process

   

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What others say

By the way, the M-400 is stinkin' awesome!  I always knew it could do this stuff, but I've never seen it in action.  I set the loaner board up, stuck in my thumb drive, loaded my settings, and bam, there they were!

Every tweak, every name, every setting, all right there!

Just thought I'd share that with you!

Wayne

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